What were the arguments for and against Indian Removal?

What was the argument against the Indian Removal Act?

Jackson warned the tribes that if they failed to move, they would lose their independence and fall under state laws. Jackson backed an Indian removal bill in Congress. Members of Congress like Davy Crockett argued that Jackson violated the Constitution by refusing to enforce treaties that guaranteed Indian land rights.

What were the main arguments for the removal of the Cherokee people?

The removal of the Cherokees was a product of the demand for arable land during the rampant growth of cotton agriculture in the Southeast, the discovery of gold on Cherokee land, and the racial prejudice that many white southerners harbored toward American Indians.

What are Jackson’s arguments regarding Indian Removal?

Jackson declared that removal would “incalculably strengthen the southwestern frontier.” Clearing Alabama and Mississippi of their Indian populations, he said, would “enable those states to advance rapidly in population, wealth, and power.”

Who was opposed to the Indian Removal Act?

Papers of John Ross

The Cherokee Nation, led by Principal Chief John Ross, resisted the Indian Removal Act, even in the face of assaults on its sovereign rights by the state of Georgia and violence against Cherokee people.

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What killed people on the Trail of Tears?

Severe exposure, starvation and disease ravaged tribes during their forced migration to present-day Oklahoma. … As many as 4,000 died of disease, starvation and exposure during their detention and forced migration through nine states that became known as the “Trail of Tears.”

What were the arguments for and against Indian removal quizlet?

The major arguments against indian removal were that they should try to assimilate the Indians into American society as was done with the Cherokees, and many also felt that it was unethical to just get rid of any agreements that they had made with the Indians just because they felt they were superior.

Who opposed the Trail of Tears?

Opposition to the removal was led by Chief John Ross, a mixed-blood of Scottish and one-eighth Cherokee descent.

What is Andrew Jackson’s attitude toward Indians?

Jackson’s attitude toward Native Americans was paternalistic and patronizing — he described them as children in need of guidance. and believed the removal policy was beneficial to the Indians. Most white Americans thought that the United States would never extend beyond the Mississippi.