Your question: Why was the Indian Removal Act passed?

What was the Indian Removal Act and why was it passed?

Introduction. The Indian Removal Act was signed into law by President Andrew Jackson on May 28, 1830, authorizing the president to grant lands west of the Mississippi in exchange for Indian lands within existing state borders. A few tribes went peacefully, but many resisted the relocation policy.

What was the purpose of the Indian Removal Act of 1930 what was the result?

The act authorized the president to grant Indian tribes unsettled western prairie land in exchange for their desirable territories within state borders (especially in the Southeast), from which the tribes would be removed.

Why did Jackson want to remove the natives?

Indian removal was not just a crime against humanity, it was a crime against humanity intended to abet another crime against humanity: By clearing the Cherokee from the American South, Jackson hoped to open up more land for cultivation by slave plantations.

What events led to the Indian Removal Act?

The expansion of Anglo-American settlement into the Trans-Appalachian west led to the passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830, forcing all eastern tribes to move to new homelands west of the Mississippi River in the Indian Territory.

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